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2010-2011 Bilingual Corrido Contest Results

CorridoWe are pleased to announce the 2010-2011 Corrido Contest results. The University of Arizona Poetry Center received entries from across the state representing three counties, eleven schools, and over 250 individual entries by high school students sponsored by sixteen teachers. Congratulations to all who participated! It is heartening to see such motivated, curious, and thoughtful young people contributing to the cultural vibrancy of our community.

This year's selections were made by Dean of the College of Science at the University of Arizona, Joaquin Ruiz. Fifty semi-finalists from nine schools were selected by Poetry Center staff and will be acknowledged by a special semi-finalist ribbon and certificate to be sent directly to teachers. All participants, semi-finalists, and winners are invited to attend the 2010-2011 Corrido Awards Concert on April 16th, 2011 at 4 p.m. at the Poetry Center. The event is free and open to the public and this year's winning corridos will be performed.  For more information about the Corrido Contest, including how you and your students can become involved, please visit: http://poetry.arizona.edu/k-12/corrido-poetry-center

2010-2011 Winners

1st place, Sylvana Acuña from Cholla High School sponsored by Russ Healy for "El corrido de Heriberto Acuña."

2nd place, Jesus Hurtado from Sunnyside High School sponsored by Zelika Araiza for her corrido "Padre Querido."

3rd place, Valerie Leon from Marana High School sponsored by Yvonne Segawa Gonzales for "El corrido del Colimocho."

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Tuesday, January 11, 2011

Coming Soon

The WordPlay blog is on winter holiday. Please check back in January 2011 for more great interviews and articles about bringing creative writing into your classroom, home, and community. In the meantime, here's what's upcoming for youth at the UA Poetry Center in the Spring. Mark your calendars.

Poetry Joeys: January 29, February 26, March 19.

Poetry Out Loud Regional Finals: March 3 at 8 p.m.

Bilingual Corrido Contest Concert featuring 2011 winners: April 16

Young at Art Fest: April 30

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Wednesday, December 22, 2010

Chew On This: Nonsense Stories from Poetry Joeys

Poetry Joeys at the Poetry Center

A few collaborative stories written by Poetry Joeys participants ages 4-6 on December 4th. Children were encouraged to make up their own words and create movements for them. Our next Poetry Joeys will be January 29th at 10 a.m. Hope to see you there!

Once upon a time there was a snoofjay.  He had curly horns and a zebra face, feathers on his head, a lizard chameleon body, and yellow beak.  The snoofjay nacks and snoofs.  At night he dumbers to his snookie.  In the morning he goes to bed.  He has to watch out for the Rhino and the maneless lion.  When the Snoofjay sees people, he says "Zucker.  Zacky."  Then he blows bees and grooks out of his nose.

A long time ago in Neek, eufs and geeks were having a battle.  The eufs wanted freedom, and the geeks wanted juice.  All day long the eufs snooked and all night the geeks fracked.  One day Fweak, the prince of mashed potatoes came riding on his Queaky.  When Fweak arrived he shlushed and he slooped.  The eufs gacked and gracked while the geeks boofed and ookied.  Fweak jumped off his Queaky, raised up his snond, and said, "Quackakeeky!"  The eufs choofed to the city.  The geeks went to San Diego.  And the Prince of Mashed Potatoes wackanacked home. 

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Tuesday, December 14, 2010

Sarah Kortemeier on Poetry Performance

Two factors contribute to the quality of your student performance:

#1: Energy - your voice energy should be coming from your gut and be physically pushed out to the audience.

#2: Close attention to the text - You have to listen to the text as you speak it. 

When you listen to the text, you are in the moment.  Do NOT ask your students to memorize the delivery of the performance; it won't be honest or believable. The performance shouldn't be exactly the same each time. Rather, by listening to themselves in the moment, they will respond organically and discover the poem anew each time.

When you are doing a close reading with the text, make sure you don't ask them to generalize the mood of the poem.  A generalized mood will make for a generalized performance. Instead, take the poem line by line, figure out what the most important words are in each sentence and how they should be spoken.

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Tuesday, December 7, 2010

Joshua Marie Wilkinson's Exploratory Imagery

by Julie SwSelenography by Joshua Marie Wilkinsonarstad

Joshua Marie Wilkinson is the author of five books of poetry, including Lug Your Careless Body out of the Careful Dusk (2005) which won the Iowa Poetry Prize, and Selenography (2010).  He has edited two anthologies for University of Iowa Press, including Poets on Teaching (2010), and his first feature-length film--a tour documentary about the band Califone--has just been completed.  Wilkinson is an alumnus of the University of Arizona Creative Writing MFA Program.  He lives in Chicago where he is an assistant professor at Loyola University.

Joshua Marie Wilkinson will read at the UA Poetry Center on Friday, Dec. 3 at 8 p.m. along with fellow UA alumna Kate Bernheimer.

Wilkinson will also be teaching an afternoon seminar on ancient images and threads at the Poetry Center on Saturday, Dec. 4th from 1-3 p.m.

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Thursday, December 2, 2010

Re-Appropriated Text: Kate Bernheimer and the Potential of Fairy Tales

Kate Bernheimerby Julie Swarstad

Kate Bernheimer is the author of two novels, The Complete Tales of Ketzia Gold (2001) and The Complete Tales of Merry Gold (2006), as well a short story collection titled Horse, Flower, Bird (2010).  She has also edited several fairy-tale anthologies, including My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He Ate Me: Forty New Fairy Tales (2010). Bernheimer is an alumna of the University of Arizona Creative Writing MFA Program.  She founded and edits the journal Fairy Tale Review and is Writer in Residence at the University of Louisiana in Lafayette each spring. She spends the rest of the year in Tucson.

A reading and discussion of "The Contemporary Fairy Tale" will take place at the UA Poetry Center on Wednesday, December 1, at 8:00 p.m.

Kate Bernheimer will read at the UA Poetry Center on Friday, December 3 at 8 p.m. along with fellow UA alum Joshua Marie Wilkinson.

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Tuesday, November 30, 2010

POL #4: A Difficult Poem

These are responses from our Poetry Out Loud professional development discussion on the POL rubric category "Difficulty." Please comment with your own ideas about what makes for a difficult poem! This is #4 in our POL series. Other POL discussion threads include subjectivity of judging, what makes a good poetry recitation, and choosing a poem to recite.

Poetry Recitation: What makes for a "difficult" poem?

  • Length
  • Are we talking about difficult to memorize or difficult to perform?
  • Irregular meter and lack of rhyme (to memorize) 
  • Regular meter and rhyme (to perform)--for example, "The Jabberwocky"--how do you perform this poem well?
  • How inaccessible the the poem is. Related question regarding inaccessibility: Are you talking about diction and syntax? Or do you mean a 15-year-old girl trying to get into the mind of a 70-year-old man?

Please comment with your ideas about what makes for a difficult poem.

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Tuesday, November 23, 2010

POL #3: Choosing a poem to recite

These are responses from our Poetry Out Loud professional development discussion on how choosing a poem can determine the success of a recitation. Please comment with your own ideas! Other POL discussion threads include subjectivity of judging and what makes a good poetry recitation?

How does the poem chosen reflect or determine the success of the recitation?

  • There seem to be waves of students choosing similar poems each year.
  • But it's really important to let the students choose their own poems; they have so little choice about what they read at school, and this is a chance for them to select something to which they might really connect.
  • It's important to expose kids to a whole range of poems so they know what's out there.  Also, they need to see the difference between poems on a page and spoken poems.
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Monday, November 15, 2010

Poetry Joeys: Heroines

Two heroine stories from Poetry Joys this fall.

Poetry Joeys is a Saturday morning reading and writing activity group for children ages 4-10. Teaching artists inspire participants to develop their flexibility with language through creative movement and reading and writing poetry. Upcoming Poetry Joeys on Nov. 13 and Dec. 4 at 10 a.m.

Photo Credit: Cybele Knowles

Heroine
by Emberly

I Dr. Savdenarow have a story to tell you, a story that is beyond a story, to be worth telling. Some people that watch cow documentaries know about me but not many. I save cows and buffalo. Some of my favorite cows and buffalo are Gopi and Ayapahsah. Well one day I decided to take a trip to Ghana. I'd heard of a new ibex hunter named Jospeh Demelo. When I arrived I started off to a national park where many ibex were and lured about three packs with my wheat. I traveled back the next day with my ibex for soon I'd be going back.

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Tuesday, November 9, 2010

POL #2: Judging and Subjectivity

These are responses from our Poetry Out Loud professional development discussion on judging and subjectivity issues. Please comment with your own ideas!

How do you and your students grapple with issues of subjectivity in the judging process?

  • The performances you like aren't always the ones that win--the numbers on the rubric dictate who wins.
  • Conflict of interest--teaching/coaching vs. judging.  It's much easier to just be a teacher and coach than have to be a teacher, coach and judge.
  • The judges struggle with the subjectivity of the rubric categories--each can interpret differently, for example, "Level of Difficulty"--what makes for a difficult poem? Is it length? Is it irregular meter and lack of rhyme? Is it how inaccessible the writing of the poem is? 
  • This issue of subjectivity often is an adult conflict rather than a student conflict.
  • The new required categories of poems help increase the level of sophistication of the poems chosen. (Make sure to check the list--POL has retired many poems this year!)
  • The judges may need time to "warm up" - the people who went first consistently didn't didn't do as well.  Maybe this year we should have a few past winners start first to warm up the judges?
  • There needs to be diversity on the judging panel.
  • First time judging is really hard.
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Tuesday, November 9, 2010
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