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HBO Presents: The Poetry Show

The Poetry ShowA review by Elizabeth Falcón

Elizabeth is the Poetry Center's Education Intern.  She is also a poet, MFA student, teaching artist, and a mother of two.

I recently sat down with my kids (ages 2 and 4) to watch the HBO Classical Baby's The Poetry Show, not really knowing what to expect.  What we found was a half-hour introduction to the essence of poetry, hosted by young children, who, in addition to introducing poems from William Shakespeare to Robert Frost, also explicate the poems with accessible, insightful observations.

Created on: 
Monday, June 21, 2010

You Can Write Whatever You Want: Creative Writing from the Perspective of Two Elementary School Writers

by Laynie Browne & Benjamin and Jacob Davidson

Laynie Browne & Benjamin and Jacob DavidsonLaynie Browne is the author of eight collections of poetry, most recently The Desires of Letters (Counterpath Press, 2010).  She is Elementary Education Coordinator for the Poetry Center and is currently developing an interdisciplinary outreach program to connect scientists and writers at University of Arizona and in the greater Tucson community.

Benjamin Davidson just finished 5th grade.  His hobbies include writing, fossil hunting and spending time with his pet rabbit, Bunny Bunkins.

Jacob Davidson just finished 3rd grade.  He loves math, bionicles, mechanical pencils, drawing  and writing adventure and science fiction stories and comics.  He also likes to take apart machines.

Created on: 
Tuesday, June 15, 2010

Storytelling: An Interview with Jordan Hill

Interview by Sol Davis

Jordan HillSol: As a child at a recent birthday party asked after being released from the coils of your tale spinning: "How do you remember the stories?"  In other words, what is your process for storytelling?

Jordan: My process is pretty straightforward--I read or hear a story, and then I try to tell it to someone (anyone!).  If it's written, I might read it again, but the best way for me to remember it is simply to tell it, as much as possible.  I have a pretty good memory, so that helps.  But more importantly is the fact that remembering stories is NOT the same as memorizing, as people often think.  Rather, it is more akin to remembering life experiences.  For the most part, people don't have to work to remember remarkable things that have happened to them in their life (or their day yesterday)--it simply happens, and when someone asks, "How was your day?" you don't think twice before telling the story of whatever happened.  In the same way, if one imagines a story vividly enough (whether through hearing it, reading it, or seeing it performed), then it almost becomes like one's own memories, and simply telling the story becomes as natural as telling a friend what happened to you the other day.

Created on: 
Wednesday, May 5, 2010

Colleen and Anika

AnikaColleen Burns is a volunteer and avid supporter of the Poetry Center. She and her granddaughter Anika are Poetry Joeys regulars and they spend quite a bit of time writing together.  

About writing with Anika, Collen says:

Children Anika's age (3-7) have rich imaginations and large vocabularies that can construct sophisticated stories if the physical act of writing doesn't get in the way. When children are asked to 'write' a story using an unwieldy pencil and unruly paper, this sheer physical act of writing slows down and sometimes can stop a story altogether.

Created on: 
Tuesday, April 20, 2010
Arizona Board of Regents