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adoten's blog

Summer Camp Writing

Photo Credit: Cybele KnowlesBelow is a collection of writing from this past summer at the Poetry Center's Creative Writing Camp. Enjoy!

Bella

A Super Hero
A super hero steps out into the world. A gift from the heavens to protect the land from uninvited foes. A burglar runs. Black mask and soul. A large sack trails behind. They fight and the sack pops open and a child runs out. The burglar remains behind bars.

Thoughts and Dreams
Thoughts and dreams fill my head.
All the words that have been said.
My life seems like a fantasy
without you there would be no me
I wonder each day what I would do
If I did not have you.

I was wandering
I was wandering helplessly through the desert. I was blind and using my sense of touch to find my way. Suddenly a paper bag blows towards me and I stick my hand inside. When I feel a heavy-ish metal typed object that has a handle that turns. I wonder what it could possibly be and how it got this far out in the desert. I focus on the object and describe it to myself as a smooth, cold, object that is curved at the end almost as if that was a handle. All the way to the other end there was another part that was similar, only not as curved, and you could twist it and crank it. What a mysterious object. I marveled at it once more before it blew off, and I continued on my journey.

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Thursday, August 30, 2012

The Reading Series in the Classroom: Kate Bernheimer

Kate BernheimerThe Poetry Center’s Fall Reading Series kicks off this Thursday, August 30th at 7:00 p.m., featuring writers Cynthia Hogue and Kate Bernheimer. The Reading Series is a great way to teach writing and expose students to poetry, stories, and essays that they might not encounter in the classroom. This Fall, Wordplay will be writing a series of blog posts titled, “The Reading Series in the Classroom,” which will highlight a story or poem by writers from this Fall’s Reading Series. In addition to providing a story or poem for students to read, we’ll also provide a set of writing prompts, that both parents and teachers can utilize with their students. We hope that these posts will not only get your students writing, but that the posts will also expose them to our Reading Series. Kate's reading will be most salient for middle to high school students, so we're including this Extra Credit Worksheet and this great interview with local poet and teacher, Christopher Nelson. (Teachers: Feel free to download the worksheet and interview, which are both designed to help students reflect on our Poetry Readings. Please modify it as it suits your classroom needs.) Check out VOCA, our audio-video library, and watch this great reading with Kate Bernheimer.

Check out her short story, A Petting Zoo Tale, which also appeals to a K-5 audience. (After you read the story, check out this fun, interactive version of the story, from Born Magazine.) Then follow the writing prompts below.

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Tuesday, August 28, 2012

A Scavenger Hunt

Jeevan NarneyJeevan Narney is an MFA candidate in poetry at the University of Arizona, and was a writer-in-residence at Sam Hughes Elementary.

I think the Family Days event was the highlight out of all the field work that I did this semester. I saw the children of Tucson come out of the community to the University of Arizona Poetry Center for one purpose: poetry. The November wind blew, and the morning sun lit the roof of our hair. It was a great day. The air was soon populated with the voices of laughing children, whose ages ranged from infant to high school. The parents smiled like children themselves. They were happy to be here with their children. It's been a neat semester of seeing how the Poetry Center provides poetic opportunities to learn more about poetry to our youth in the Tucson community.

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Thursday, August 23, 2012

Joy Acey Recommends...

Joy Acey, the Princess of Poetry, has won many prizes for her poems and has published in several small journals and anthologies including HIGHLIGHT'S High Five magazine. She is a performance artist and conducts writing workshops for children and adults. She's hopped a freight train and rode in a boxcar over the world's second largest wooden trestle bridge. She was on a TV game show and won enough money for a trip to Australia. She has lived in England and Japan. She has walked across a volcano in Hawaii and a glacier in New Zealand. She has gone swimming with iguanas in the Galapagos and was in Ecuador during a revolution. She recently returned from a trip to Peru where she visited the rainforest. Always looking for new adventures to write about, she currently lives in Tucson, Arizona with her husband and a welsh springer spaniel named Spot. She has a blog www.poetryforkidsjoy.blogspot.com where she daily posts an orginal poem for children and a writing exercise.

10 books of poetry...

  1. PIRATES or COWBOYS by children's poet David L. Harrison, illustrated by Dan Burr, published by Wordsong. Both of these books are beautiful. With the over-sized format, these books could easily be mistaken for coffee table books. The poems are a good variety, which explore the lives of pirates or cowboys.
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Wednesday, August 22, 2012

Their Creative World

Jeevan Narney is an MFA candidate in poetry at the University of Arizona, and a writer-in-residence at Sam Hughes Elementary.

Nothing gave me greater joy this semester than waking up on Friday mornings, knowing that I was going to be teaching poetry to a fabulous, energetic group of 2nd graders at the Sam Hughes Elementary School. It was so much fun working with Ben as my team-teaching partner. Ms. Dunn, their teacher, was incredibly supportive in helping us out when we needed it. The students' enthusiasm warmed my heart! They were so eager to read their poems out loud in class to their classmates. I will miss the children's smiling faces and reading their adventurous poems! I enjoyed being part of their creative world. I learned so much about teamwork and creating poetry lessons which have inspired my own writing. The children of our community rock!

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Friday, June 29, 2012

This Is My Dream

Sarah MinorSarah Minor is a teaching artist at Corbett Elementary, and is pursuing her MFA in Nonfiction at The University of Arizona.

It seemed like I had just stepped into my classroom for that full first hour, my heart still aflutter, consistently surprised to look out and find 22 pairs of fourth grade eyes on me at all times. We had reached the heart of our first lesson, the crucial moment in which I transitioned from a partner activity to individual writing. If the students felt unprepared or uninspired at this point, I might find myself still the focal point of all those eyes rather than focusing their energy on the empty blue lines below their chins. “Okay class,” I said, “now you get to turn back to your own desks and write your own story about an imaginary city by yourselves!” To my left, David Jurkowitz’s eyes grew wide. He locked his elbows and raised his small fists in to the air and shouted, “THIS IS MY DREAM!!” And promptly fell over in his chair, having been balanced on two chair legs during my announcement. This, I thought, could be a good residency. Throughout our semester together, Ms. Pierson’s 4th grade class impressed me with their grasp of unique voices, their deep, dark tales and creatures, and the sharp honesty of their first nonfiction stories. They really were my dream, too.

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Monday, June 4, 2012

Breaking the Rules of Fiction

Lisa LevineLisa Levine is a teaching artist at Corbett Elementary, and an MFA Candidate in Fiction at The University of Arizona.

Teaching fiction to Jill Carey's second grade class confounds the rules of fiction. In my class' stories, every person has superpowers, pizza is the universal food, and magic is the only ending that counts. The minds of second graders are so able to transition from real to made-up that setting boundaries from one to the other is like building walls over running water - the awareness of real and made-up is fixed in their minds, but their beliefs are still entrenched in a child's world, where the unimaginable is not only imaginable, it's still kind of true. My most memorable instance of realizing that second grade is a time of unmatched creative transformation was when one student read about his imaginary character, who bore a strong resemblance to a certain ubiquitous character of wizard and literary fame - the class called him out on using someone else's character. "He's Harry Potter," one girl said, and this boy blushed and hid a little behind his story as he left the front of the room. "Yes," he said. "But he's mine too."

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Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Teaching "IHope" Poems

Hilary GanHilary Gan is a teaching artist at Hollinger Elementary, an Education Intern at the Poetry Center, and an MFA candidate in Fiction at The University of Arizona.

I wrote with 17 first and second-graders on Friday afternoons. It was consistently the best part of my week. Not only were the kids able to relax and take a break from normal school work; I was, too. My favorite lesson caught me by surprise--I had learned that this class had never read any of Shel Silverstein, so I picked up my favorite Silverstein poem, "Whatif," which talks about the whatifs which crawl inside your ears at night and whisper things that could go wrong the next day. I had my students read it to me, and then draw pictures of what they thought a whatif looked like; finally, I had them write poems of Ihopes, which crawl into your ears and tell you about possibilities. When Katie came up to read her poem at the end of the class, my eyes went a little leaky. Her poem was so full of the juxtaposition of small, childhood things, and the big hopes that everybody has, even adults, and she said it all so baldly and without hedging that I was very touched.

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Monday, May 21, 2012

A Visit From the Mayor

Mayor Jonathan Rothschild Poetry Center VisitLast week, our beloved Field Trip Intern Timothy Dyke conducted his very last field trip at the Poetry Center, and also hosted a special guest, poet and Tucson mayor Jonathan Rothschild!   Here are some photos and book-spine poems generated by the students (and teacher) of Miles Learning Center on Tim's last day.

What is Found there
the night of stones
outside in
the shallow end of sleep
Elephants and angels
- Madeleine
 

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Thursday, May 10, 2012

Reflections of a 49-year-old Intern

Tim DykeFor the past two years, Tim Dyke has been one our wonderful Education Interns. He's recently graduated from The University of Arizona with his MFA in Fiction, and will be returning to his Hawaii homeland to teach. We will miss him dearly.          

Even if I am the world’s oldest intern, I still am glad that I have had the opportunity to work at the Poetry Center for the past two years. In the spring of 2010, I made the decision to leave Honolulu, Hawaii, where I had lived and worked as a high school English teacher for 18 years. I would travel to Tucson, AZ, a place I’d never been before. I’d enroll in the Creative Writing graduate program to pursue an MFA degree in fiction writing.  In order to augment my funding support, I applied to be an Education Intern at the University of Arizona Poetry Center. I still remember the interview. I hadn’t had to apply for a job in almost two decades, and then all of a sudden there I was: I remember sitting in my friend’s office, borrowing his phone as I talked to the Poetry Center staff about joining them that upcoming autumn.

Two years later I am all set to graduate. With the support of the Creative Writing faculty and my classmates in workshop, I have produced a novel manuscript and have read and learned so much about fiction writing. 

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Monday, April 23, 2012
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